Category Archives: Voluntary Compliance Programs

IRS Plan Correction Program Goes Digital

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The IRS maintains a voluntary correction program for retirement plan sponsors, called the Employee Plans Compliance Resolution Program, or EPCRS. Plan errors that have occurred within 2 years generally may be eligible for self-correction, whereas older plan errors that are “significant” must be corrected with IRS approval through the Voluntary Compliance Program, or VCP. EPCRS is a very popular way for plan sponsors to resolve plan problems on their own schedule, and without suffering the monetary penalties that likely would apply in the event of a plan audit.

On September 28, 2018, the IRS announced that, effective April 1, 2019, VCP submissions, including payment of “user fees,” must be made electronically through the www.pay.gov website, per the instructions set forth in Revenue Procedure 2018-52. Plan sponsors, or their authorized representatives, may voluntarily use the electronic submission method starting January 1, 2019, but it will be mandatory starting April 1, 2019 and the IRS will reject hard copy VCP submissions postmarked on or after that date.

Revenue Procedure 2018-52 makes extensive revisions to Sections 2, 10 and 11 of Revenue Procedure 2016-51 (and otherwise generally supersedes it) to describe the new electronic user fee payment and VCP submission methods.  Under the new methods, a plan sponsor must either itself submit the VCP application electronically, or authorize a representative to do so via Form 2848, Power of Attorney.  Only third parties designated via Form 2848, such as attorneys, CPAs, or enrolled agents, can sign and file the VCP application on the plan sponsor’s behalf.  (A plan sponsor may use Form 8821 to designate other representatives (such as unenrolled return preparers) to inspect or receive confidential information from IRS about the submission.)

Under the new procedures, the VCP submission process will be as follows (note that links to IRS forms are not provided as they may be changing as a result of the new Revenue Procedure):

  1. Create an account at www.pay.gov, if one does not already exist. If using an authorized representative (AR), confirm that the AR has a www.pay.gov account.
  2. Using www.pay.gov, complete Form 8950, Application for Voluntary Correction Program (VCP).  If using an AR, the AR will complete the form.
  3. Assemble, into a single PDF file not exceeding 15 MB, the following:
  • Plan Sponsor’s signed Penalty of Perjury Statement. (This used to be part of IRS Form 8950 but now will be a separate statement.
  • Form 2848, Power of Attorney, or Form 8821, Tax Information Authorization. If using an AR, you must check line 5a for “Other acts authorized” on Form 2848 and include as a description “signing and filing of the Form 8950 and accompanying documents as part of a VCP submission.”
  • Form 14568, Model VCP Compliance Statement, and any/all applicable Schedules to same (Forms 14568-A through 14568-I), and required enclosures.  Alternatively, a cover letter and separate written narrative could be used.
  • Sample earnings calculations and earnings computations.
  • Relevant plan document language or full plan document when applicable (e.g., non-amender failures).
  • Copy of opinion, advisory, or determination letter, if applicable, pertaining to the plan document.
  • Any other required information, such as statement required for 403(b) plans re: cooperation of all investment providers.

4.  Upload the PDF file at www.pay.gov. If information supporting the submission exceeds the size limit, follow special fax instructions set forth in Section 11.03(7) of the Revenue Procedure.

5.  Use www.pay.gov to pay the user fee, as set forth in Appendix A of Revenue Procedure 2018-4 (and successor Revenue Procedures issued at the beginning of each year). The user fees are now based on plan assets rather than the number of plan participants.

6.  Keep the “Payment Confirmation – Application for Voluntary Correction Program” that is generated on successful filing through pay.gov; the Tracking ID on this receipt serves as the IRS control number for your submission and is official acknowledgement of the submission; if no confirmation is generated call (877) 829-5500 for assistance.

If you discover additional operational errors after submitting your VCP materials, but before the submission has been assigned to an IRS representative, you are directed to call the VCP Status Inquiry Line at (626) 927-2011 (not toll-free) for further information. Although it is currently customary for the IRS to contact the filer once a submission is assigned to an IRS representative, this may not be the case in the future; in the Revenue Procedure the IRS reserves the right to process submissions and issue compliance statements without any prior contact with the filer.  If the IRS gets the jump on you in this manner, you will likely have to pay a new user fee and address the later-discovered errors under a new VCP submission.

Even before the recent increase in VCP user fees, EPCRS was a consistently strong revenue source for the IRS and the new digital streamlining of the program will likely increase its use by plan sponsors over time.

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Filed under 401(k) Plans, 403(b) Plans, EPCRS, ERISA, VCP, Voluntary Compliance Programs

IRS Questionnaire Sent to College, University Plans Does Not Put Plans “Under Examination” but EPCRS Availability Remains Unclear

The IRS Employee Plans Compliance Unit (“EPCU”) is in the process of sending over 300 written questionnaires to a random sample of small, medium, and large institutes of higher education, including private and public colleges, universities, and trade and vocational schools. The questionnaire – on IRS Form 886-A – contains 18 separate questions but mainly focuses on one issue: whether the organization’s Section 403(b) plan satisfies the “universal availability” requirement. Under that rule, if one employee has the opportunity to defer a portion of salary under the plan, then generally all employees must be offered the same opportunity. (Very limited exceptions apply.) The questionnaire seeks to identify plans that are not making the deferral opportunity universally available, either because the limited exceptions are misapplied, or the employer imposes additional conditions on deferring that are not permitted under law. A number of the questions refer specifically to exclusion of groups of employees unique to educational organizations, such as medical residents, and different categories of instructors, professors or lecturers. An IRS announcement on the project as well as links to the questionnaire, instructions for filling out same, and a glossary of terms, can be found here.

Organizations have 25 days to complete and return the questionnaire by fax, mail or e-mail. Upon review of the questionnaire, the IRS will either deem a plan to be compliant and issue a “closing letter,” or will request additional information from the organization. If a problem is found the IRS will work with the organization to correct it, for instance by making fully vested employer contributions to restore the lost opportunity to make tax deferrals in prior plan years. (Generally the employer contribution requirement is equal to half of the deferral the employee would have made (the “lost opportunity” cost), but specific correction methods are not set forth in the questionnaire or in the IRS announcement of the program. Correction methods will be specified in a follow-up letter sent to organizations whose initial responses require follow-up.

Receipt of the questionnaire will not mean that a plan sponsor is “Under Examination” and thus barred from using the Voluntary Correction Program under the Employee Plans Compliance Resolution System (“EPCRS”) to correct 403(b) operational errors currently identified in EPCRS (for instance, failure timely to implement an employee’s salary deferral election). This was confirmed by the IRS, with regard to a similar 401(k) questionnaire project, in a recent issue of Employee Plans News. That said, the current version of EPCRS, set forth in Revenue Procedure 2008-50, does not provide as many corrections for Section 403(b) plans as are available to other types of qualified plans, largely because Rev. Proc. 2008-50 was drafted before Section 403(b) plans were required to be set forth in writing. For instance, VCP is not available for sponsors that lack a written Section 403(b) plan document or that have failed to operate the plan in accordance with its written terms, nor is it available for employer eligibility failures. The IRS is expected later this year to release an updated version of EPCRS that covers Section 403(b) corrections in greater detail. However, it is not known whether or not the new Revenue Procedure will contain relief for sponsors that failed to timely put a plan document in place or failed to operate a plan in accordance with its written terms.

Tax-exempt employers who receive a questionnaire strongly are advised to consult with their professional tax advisors before submitting a response to the IRS. An incorrect response – or an accurate response – could trigger potential contribution and tax liability on a significant scale, and the availability of EPCRS is uncertain. Such discoveries are better made – and resolutions discussed – with private advisors before the IRS is part of the conversation. If additional time to complete the questionnaire is necessary, employers should request it of the IRS before reaching the 25-day deadline.

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Filed under 403(b) Plans, Voluntary Compliance Programs