Category Archives: Uncategorized

Using Forfeitures for Corrective Contributions: Look Before You Leap

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When a 401(k) plan fails nondiscrimination testing that applies to employee salary deferrals, one way to correct the failure is for the plan sponsor to make qualified nonelective contributions (QNECs) on behalf of non-highly compensated employees. The same approach may apply to matching contribution failures, but in that instance the corrective contributions are called qualified matching contributions or QMACs.   QNECs and QMACs must satisfy the same vesting and distribution restrictions that apply to employee salary deferrals – they must always be 100% vested and must not be allowed to be distributed prior to death, disability, severance from employment, attainment of age 59.5, or plan termination (i.e., they may not be used for hardship distributions).

Existing Treasury Regulations provide that QNEC and QMAC contributions must be 100% vested at when they are contributed to the plan, not just when they are allocated to an account.

Forfeitures are unvested employer contributions when originally contributed to the plan, and for this reason the IRS has taken the position that a plan sponsor may not use forfeitures to fund QNECs or QMACs. And in fact, the prohibition on using forfeitures to make QNECs or QMACs is reflected in the Internal Revenue Manual, and the IRS Employee Plans Compliance Resolution System (EPCRS) which outlines voluntary correction methods for plan sponsors.

On January 18, 2017, the IRS changed course by publishing a proposed regulation requiring that QNECs and QMACs be 100% vested only when they are allocated to an account, and need not be 100% vested when originally contributed to a plan. This means that forfeitures may be used to make QNECs and QMACs if the underlying plan document permits.  It would logically follow that other employer contributions that are not fully vested when made may be re-designated as QNECs to satisfy ADP testing for a plan year.

The proposed regulation is applicable for plan years beginning on or after January 18, 2017 (January 1, 2018 for calendar year plans) but may be relied upon prior to that date.

Caution is advised, however, for plan sponsors wanting to make immediate use of forfeiture accounts for QNECs and QMACs. First, they must confirm that their plan document does not prohibit use of forfeitures for this purpose.  In the author’s experience, master and prototype and volume submitter basic plan documents may expressly prohibit use of forfeitures for QNECs and QMACs.  The language below was taken from a master and prototype basic plan document:

7) Limitation on forfeiture uses. Effective for plan years beginning after the adoption of the 2010 Cumulative List (Notice 2010-90) restatement, forfeitures cannot be used as QNECs, QMACs, Elective Deferrals, or Safe Harbor Contributions (Code §401(k)(12)) other than QACA Safe Harbor Contributions (Code §401(k)(13)). However, forfeitures can be used to reduce Fixed Additional Matching Contributions which satisfy the ACP test safe harbor or as Discretionary Additional Matching Contributions.

Plan sponsors that locate a similar prohibition in their plan document should contact the prototype plan sponsor to determine whether they will be amending their plan document to permit use of forfeitures for QNECs and QMACs and when such an amendment will take effect.

In instances where there is no express plan prohibition, plan sponsors that are making use of EPCRS to correct plan failures should try to ascertain from the IRS whether or not they may use forfeitures to fund QNECs or QMACs as part of a self-correction or VCP application, as the most recently updated EPCRS Revenue Procedure (Revenue Procedure 2016-51, 2016-41 I.R.B. 465), expressly disallows this at Section §6.02(4)(c) and Appendix A §.03. Hopefully, the IRS will issue some guidance on this point without too much delay.

 

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Filed under 401(k) Plans, ADP and ACP Testing, Benefit Plan Design, Nondiscrimination Testing for Qualified Retirement Plans, Uncategorized

Update on ACA Reporting Duties – Revised for IRS Notice 2016-70

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ACA reporting deadlines for applicable large employers arrive early in 2017 and, through Notice 2016-70,  the IRS has now offered a 30-day extension on the January 31, 2017 deadline to furnish employee statements – Forms 1095-C.  The new deadline is March 2, 2017 and it is a hard deadline, no 30-day extension may be obtained.  There is no extension on the deadline to file Forms 1095-C with the IRS under cover of transmittal Form 1094-C.  The deadline for paper filing is February 28, 2017 and the electronic filing deadline is March 31, 2017.  (Electronic filing is required for applicable large employers filing 250 or more employee statements.)

Also in Notice 2016-70, the IRS extended its good faith compliance policy for timely furnished and filed 2016 Forms 1095-C and 1094-C that may contain inaccurate or incomplete information.  This relief is only available for timely filed, but inaccurate or incomplete returns.  Relief for failure to furnish/file altogether is available only on a showing of reasonable cause, and this is a narrow standard (e.g., fire, flood, major illness).

In addition to covering the new transition relief, this-brief-powerpoint-presentation summarizes some changes in the final 2016 Forms 1094-C and 1095-c, from last year’s versions, and includes some helpful hints for accurate and timely reporting.

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Filed under Affordable Care Act, Applicable Large Employer Reporting, Employer Shared Responsibility, Minimum Essential Coverage Reporting, PPACA, Uncategorized

Benefits Compliance: Where You Get It; What You Need (Poll)

Y01VDYAX63Changes in the law and continued advances in technology have made benefits compliance a constantly shifting landscape.  As one of many potential sources for your own path towards benefits compliance, E for ERISA would very much appreciate your participation in the following poll, which asks a few simple questions about where you currently get your benefits compliance services and what you may still need in that regard.  Thank you in advance for (anonymously) sharing your thoughts and experiences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under 401(k) Plans, 403(b) Plans, Affordable Care Act, Applicable Large Employer Reporting, Benefit Plan Design, Employer Shared Responsibility, ERISA, Federally Facilitated Exchange, Fiduciary and Fee Issues, Fiduciary Issues, Fringe Benefits, Health Care Reform, HIPAA and HITECH, Payroll Issues, Plan Reporting and Disclosure Duties, PPACA, Profit Sharing Plan, Uncategorized

A Conversation About the DOL Fiduciary Rule (Audio File)

The Department of Labor recently published a final regulation defining a “fiduciary” for purposes of investment advice rendered for a fee with regard to “retirement accounts.” The final regulation marks the first change in the regulatory definition of this type of fiduciary since the regulation originally was published in 1975. Retirement accounts under the new rule include those held under qualified plans (e.g., 401(k), pension plans), which have always been subject to ERISA, and now for the first time with regard to IRAs, which formerly were subject only to Internal Revenue Code rules governing self-dealing and other forms of prohibited transactions that the Internal Revenue Service enforced through audits.  The new rule – together with new and amended prohibited transaction exemptions related to the rule – becomes applicable on April 10, 2017, with full implementation required on and after January 1, 2018.

Recently I was interviewed about the new definition of an investment advice fiduciary for an episode of Money Talk that KZSB (1290 AM) will broadcast a 2:00 p.m. PDT on June 20, 2016.  The interview provides a broad overview of the rule and how it will likely impact IRA investors, employers, and the investment industry.  Joining me were program hosts Dianne Duva, Partner at Arlington Financial Advisors, and Neil Kriesel, who worked in finance for many years, has taught at SBCC as an adjunct faculty member and serves on the SBCC Foundation Board and various other non-profit organizations.  Click below to listen.

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Filed under 401(k) Plans, Fiduciary and Fee Issues, Fiduciary Issues, IRA Issues, Uncategorized

Waiting Period Limits for California Small Group Early Renewals

The following post was published on September 5, 2014 and updated on September 23, 2014.

As we posted a few days ago, some uncertainty remains for California employers regarding eligibility waiting period limits for “late renewal” insured group health plans that follow, most commonly, a December 1 through November 30 cycle.   Many small to mid-sized California employers switched from a calendar year policy cycle to a late renewal cycle in 2013, in an effort to postpone their exposure to increased health premiums resulting from ACA coverage mandates and insurance market reforms taking effect in 2014.

The ACA permits an eligibility waiting period of up to 90 days for plan years beginning on and after January 1, 2014.  California law governing insurers and HMOs restricted the waiting period to 60 days under legislation that very recently has been repealed effective January 1, 2015.  The repeal left open the issue of whether carriers would hold employers renewing late in 2014 to the 60-day waiting period limit.

At least with regard to small group coverage (2 to 50 employees), the original answer to that question appeared to be “yes” for two major carriers in the state whose approach may be a bellwether for other carriers:  Anthem and Blue Shield.   Originally upon announcement of S.B. 1034’s passage, neither would permit a 90-day eligibility waiting period on small group policies or HMO contracts that are renewed or first issued during the remainder of 2014.  The permissible waiting period choices were to have been limited to first of month following date of hire, or first of the month following 30 days from the date of hire.  However Anthem later modified its position in this regard, and will permit employers to request, in writing, a waiting period extension (not to exceed 90 days total) to go into effect as of January 1, 2015.  Blue Shield appears to be sticking to the renewal options listed.

For small group policy renewals and new sales occurring on or after January 1, 2015, the carriers will permit waiting periods equal to 90 days from date of hire, first of month following date of hire, and first of month following 30 days from the date of hire.   One of the carriers may also offer first of month following 60 days, but this is not yet certain.  Another carrier will prorate premiums when the 91st day after hire falls in the middle of the month.

So far these carriers are silent on waiting periods for large group renewals and new sales occurring in the remainder of this year.  Employers in this category likely can establish their own waiting period limits within the overall ACA 90-day cap.

The carriers are permitting the 90-day waiting period limit for individuals whose small group coverage takes effect on or after January 1, 2015.  Therefore, coverage for individuals whose waiting period bridges the end of 2014 and the beginning of 2015 should begin at the end of the waiting period that began in 2014, rather than after “tacking on” additional wait time permitted in 2015.  Although not expressly required by carriers, this would seem to be a logical strategy for large group employers to take with regard to employees whose waiting periods began to elapse at a time when the maximum limit was 60 days, but end after the point at which the employer increased the maximum limit to 90 days.   This would also have the advantage of meeting ACA requirements so long as the total waiting period does not exceed 90 days.

The final regulations on the maximum ACA waiting period state that carriers (technically, “health insurance issuers”) may rely on eligibility information reported by the employer or other plan sponsor, and will not be considered to have violated the ACA waiting period rule in instances where both of the following requirements are met:

  • the carrier requires the employer/plan sponsor to disclose the terms of any eligibility conditions or waiting period, and to provide notice of any changes to these rules; and
  • the carrier has no specific knowledge of the imposition of a waiting period that would exceed the maximum 90-day period.

Imposing eligibility waiting periods in excess of the ACA 90-day cap other than will trigger excise taxes equal to $100 per day, per impacted plan participant, up to a maximum of $500,000.  Employers and other plan sponsors must voluntarily disclose and pay the tax on IRS Form 8928, Section II.   The excise tax may be abated in whole or in part if the violation was due to reasonable cause and not willful neglect.

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ACA Developments: Individual Mandate Transitional Relief; Nondiscrimination Regulations Yet to Issue

The IRS recently issued Notice 2013-42, which grants transition relief from the individual shared responsibility penalty for persons whose employers offer group health coverage on a non-calendar year basis.  Specifically, individuals who are eligible under an employer’s non-calendar year plan with a plan year beginning in 2013 and ending in 2014 will not be liable for the individual shared responsibility for the period from January 1, 2014, through the month in which the employer’s 2013-2014 plan year ends.  This frees these individuals from the duty to enroll in the plan in 2013, simply in order to have secured minimum essential coverage as of January 1, 2014.  Examples set forth in the notice suggest that an employee whose plan is on a non-calendar year cycle can wait to enroll in the 2014-2015 plan year, even when the employee’s spouse is eligible for coverage under a calendar year plan.

Secondly, June 30, 2013 came and went without the Treasury Department publishing proposed regulations on nondiscrimination rules for insured health plans.  The ACA imposes these rules but the Treasury Department has suspended enforcement of them, pending issuance of regulatory guidance.  As tax regulations generally cannot go into effect earlier than 6 months after publication, they needed to have been published by June 30 in order to take effect January 1, 2014.  It now appears possible if not likely that the nondiscrimination rules will not take effect until 2015, to allow employers who must commit to insurance policies on a 12-month cycle adequate time in 2014 both to understand the new regulations and to make plan design changes as needed. in order to comply with them.

Both of these developments transpired before the Treasury Department announced that it would not enforce until 2015 employer shared responsibility tax penalties, or tax reporting duties related to the employer and individual mandates, originally required in 2014.   It is likely that the individual mandate will go into effect on January 1, 2014 as scheduled.  What is not clear at this point is whether nondiscrimination rules will go into effect concurrently with the delayed employer mandate penalties, in 2015, or will be delayed an additional year, to 2016.    Given the Treasury’s expressed goal, in its memo, of implementing the ACA in a “careful, thoughtful manner,” it is possible that more time for compliance will be provided.

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Filed under Affordable Care Act, Benefit Plan Design, Employer Shared Responsibility, Individual Shared Responsibility, Nondiscrimination Rules for Insured Health Plans, PPACA, Uncategorized

ACA Implementation for Small to Mid-Sized Employers: A Short Podcast

Recently, Mark Weiss of the Advisory Law Group interviewed me on Affordable Care Act compliance issues for small to mid-sized employers. You can listen to the resulting podcast on Mark’s Wisdom.Applied blog by clicking here.   Topics covered include preparing for pay or play, employee interaction with the exchanges, exchange readiness (or un-readiness), and the viability of wellness programs in a small employer setting.  Thank you, Mark, for giving me the opportunity to share my views with your audience.

Mark’s practice focuses on medical groups, physicians and other healthcare providers, and I hope to soon interview him on the ACA as seen from the provider perspective, including how it is changing – in several different aspects – the ways in which healthcare is delivered in the U.S.     The law is not much more popular among healthcare providers, than it is among employers, but for different reasons Mark will ably explain.  Check back soon for more good information along those lines.

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Filed under Affordable Care Act, PPACA, Uncategorized, Wellness Programs