Category Archives: Americans with Disabilities Act

It’s (Summer) Time for Wellness Plan Re-Design

ev-625717-unsplash

Now that summer is here, there are only a few more months until benefit plan open enrollment for 2019 gets underway. Employers who maintain a wellness program that includes biometric testing, health risk assessments (HRAs), or medical questionnaires need to think now about how they will design their plan in the new year, as changes to the rules governing these wellness features go into effect.  This post outlines the changes and discusses the new design landscape for 2019.

What are the Changes?

During 2017 and 2018, final regulations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) limit the financial incentive employers may offer in exchange for participating in biometric testing, HRAs or medical questionnaires, to an amount equal to 30% of the cost of individual coverage (both the employee and employer portions.) The same limit applies to surcharges or penalties for not taking part.  Companion regulations under Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) apply the same cap to completion of an HRA or medical questionnaire by an employee’s spouse, because manifestation of a disease or disorder in a family member comprises genetic information on the employee.  The ADA regulations also disallow the 20% additional incentive tied to tobacco use, if the wellness program includes a blood test for nicotine or cotinine.  The ADA and Title II of GINA apply to employers with 15 or more employees.   We discussed the ADA and GINA rules in a prior post.

The American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) challenged the 30% incentive limit in court on the grounds that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) failed to prove that this cap was necessary in order for participation in the biometric testing or health risk assessment (HRA) to be “voluntary” and not coercive, which is an ADA requirement.

A federal court agreed with the AARP, and vacated the 30% incentive cap effective January 1, 2019.  (Other provisions of the ADA regulations, including notification and confidentiality rules, remain in effect.)  The court also lifted a requirement that the EEOC publish new proposed regulations on the voluntary standard by August 31, 2018.   The EEOC may issue regulations in the future (and could appeal the court decision), but wellness program design for 2019 must get underway in the absence of clear guidance on the voluntariness standard.

2019 Design Landscape

The chart below illustrates the wellness rule landscape effective January 1, 2019 for employers that are subject to the ADA. Wellness regulations under HIPAA and the ACA will continue to apply, but they do not impose any limit on incentives (or penalties) for biometric testing or HRAs that are “participation only” i.e., that do not require physical activity, or specific health outcomes.

Despite the vacated EEOC standard, employers should exercise caution in setting financial incentives for biometric testing, HRAs or medical questionnaires.  Even prior to issuing regulations, the EEOC had challenged wellness programs in several court actions, ranging from a program that conditioned biometric testing and completion of an HRA on a $20 per paycheck surcharge, to one that conditioned 100% of the premium cost on taking part in an HRA. Although the cases generally were resolved in favor of the employer, they make clear that EEOC may view even modest incentives as failing the voluntary standard.

Employers should also make sure that their wellness program follows up after gathering health data through biometric testing, HRAs or medical questionnaires, with information, advice, or programs targeted at health risks.  A wellness program that fails to do so would not qualify as an employee health program under the ADA and the voluntary wellness program exceptions would not be available.

So what are some options for 2019? There are several design “safe harbors” that do not trigger the ADA voluntariness standard:

1) Eliminating biometric testing/HRAs/medical questionnaires altogether.

2) Keeping biometric testing/HRAs/medical questionnaires, but removing any financial incentive or penalty that applied to them.

3) Offering smoking cessation programs that request self-disclosure as a tobacco user (no blood test for nicotine, cotinine).

Limiting financial incentives/penalties for biometric testing/HRAs/medical questionnaires to an amount that does not exceed 10 – 15% of the individual premium is another option. This range is just high enough to encourage participation, but it is under 20%.  In AARP v. EEOC, the court’s August 2017 ruling on summary judgment cited a RAND study noting that “high powered” incentives of 20% or more may place a disproportionate burden on lower-paid employees.

What about different incentive levels for different groups of employees? First, this may be administratively impractical, and second, it might run afoul of the HIPAA/ACA requirement that the full wellness incentive or reward be made available to all “similarly situated” individuals.  Groupings of employees for this purpose must be based on bona fide, employment-based classifications that are consistent with the employer’s usual business practice, such as between full-time and part-time employees, hourly and salaried, different lengths of employment, or different geographic locations.   For many employers, these criteria may not always neatly overlap with different compensation levels.

In sum, employers who do not wish to eliminate biometric testing and HRAs/medical questionnaires from their wellness programs should anticipate living with some uncertainty about whether their financial incentives meet ADA standards.   Engaging in careful planning in the coming weeks, together with benefit advisors and legal counsel, can help keep the risk to a minimum.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Affordable Care Act, Americans with Disabilities Act, Benefit Plan Design, GINA/Genetic Privacy, HIPAA and HITECH, PPACA, Uncategorized, Wellness Programs

Final Rules on Wellness Program Design: A Chart and FAQs

Recent months have seen a flurry of new guidance related to wellness programs:

  • On May 17, 2016 the EEOC published final regulations and interpretive guidance on wellness programs that include disability-related questions (such as a Health Risk Assessment or HRA) and/or medical examinations (such as biometric testing). The new rules and guidance fall under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which permits collection of medical information under an employer’s “voluntary” wellness program. They replace proposed rules and guidance which were published in April 2015. We addressed the proposed rules in an earlier post.
  • In addition, EEOC published in the same issue of the Federal Register final regulations on wellness program participation by employees’ spouses, under Title II of the Genetic Information Nondisclosure Act (GINA). For GINA purposes, health status or health history about a family member, including a spouse, constitutes genetic of the employee. The rule replaces proposed regulations issued in October 2015.
  • In connection with the final rules the EEOC also published a model confidentiality notice to be provided to wellness program participants.
  • Finally, the Internal Revenue Service issued guidance regarding taxation of cash rewards to participate in wellness programs, and reimbursement of premiums paid through cafeteria plan deductions.

Overview. The new ADA and GINA regulations supplement, and in some instances contradict, existing wellness regulations under HIPAA, as modified by the ACA. Most notably, the HIPAA/ACA rules do not impose any incentive limitation on wellness programs that are “participation only,” whereas the ADA and GINA rules do impose a maximum incentive limit if the “participation only” program includes an HRA or biometric testing. The ADA and GINA regulations apply to employers with 15 or more employees, and to wellness programs that are “self-standing” as well as those offered in connection with a group health plan. HIPAA/ACA rules apply only to wellness programs that themselves comprise a group health plan, or that are offered with group health plans.

Effective Dates. The ADA and GINA incentive limits and ADA notice requirement discussed below go into effect for plan years beginning on or after January 1, 2017 (in most cases this will be the year of the health plan to which the wellness program relates). Employers may choose to voluntarily comply with these rules prior to that time. The balance of the new guidance goes into effect immediately, as the EEOC has characterized it as clarification of existing law.

Compliance Chart. Below is a chart summarizing permissible dollar or in-kind incentives for wellness program participation, along with some other requirements under the new ADA and GINA regulations, followed by some frequently asked questions on the new wellness program guidance.

Capturechart

* If multiple health plans are offered, the 30% limit applies to the lowest cost major medical plan. If no plans are offered, the reference point is the premium paid for a 40 year old non-smoker enrolled in the second-lowest silver plan on the health exchange in the employer’s region.

Q.1:     What are reasonable design criteria for wellness programs under ADA regulations? 

A.1:      A wellness program is “reasonably designed to promote health or prevent disease” if it is (a) not highly suspect in the method chosen to promote health or prevent disease; (b) does not require an overly burdensome period of time to participate, involve unreasonably intrusive procedures or significant costs; (c) is not a subterfuge for violating the ADA or other legal requirements or a means to simply shift costs from employer to employees; and, (d) if medical information is collected, the program provides feedback or advice to participants about risk factors or uses aggregate medical data to design programs or treat specific conditions.

Q.2: How do these requirements differ from the requirements for wellness programs under HIPAA/ACA?

A.2: In addition to the differences in incentive limits noted in the chart above, the HIPAA/ACA test applies a reasonable design criteria only to health-contingent wellness programs, while the ADA rules apply to participation-only wellness programs that include HRAs and/or biometric testing.  In addition, the HIPAA/ACA rules require that participants have a chance to qualify for the full incentive at least annually, and must offer to waive incentive criteria, or offer a reasonable alternative standard, to permit equal participation by all similarly situated participants.  This is somewhat similar, but not identical, to the ADA reasonable accommodation requirement.  HIPAA/ACA also requires that notice of the waiver/reasonable alternative standard be provided.

Q.3: Do GINA wellness program regulations add any requirements?

A.3: Yes, if a spouse is requested to complete an HRA or undergo biometric testing, a separate incentive limit equal to 30% of the total cost of self-only coverage applies, and the spouse must sign a written, knowing and voluntary authorization to take part in the HRA or biometric testing.  The authorization must describe the genetic information being obtained (e.g. health history information in an HRA), how it will be used, and any restrictions on its disclosure.  Additionally, employers may not deny access to coverage or otherwise retaliate in the event a spouse refuses to provide HRA/biometric testing.

Q.4: What are the criteria of a “voluntary” wellness program under ADA regulations?

A.4: A wellness program is voluntary for ADA purposes if employees are not required to participate in the program, are not punished for not participating (e.g., not granted access to all health benefits or plan options), and are not subjected to adverse employment action, retaliation, coercion or other prohibited conduct in order to get them to participate, or to reach certain health goals. In addition, incentives are capped at the percentages shown in the chart, and participants are provided with a written notice re: collection and use of medical information.  The EEOC has provided a form of model notice.

Q.5: What does the model EEOC notice state, and is it mandatory or can we use our own version?

A.5: The notice, which should be provided prior to participation in an HRA or biometric exam, may be modified but must be written in language that recipients can understand, and must describe what medical information is collected, what measures will be used to protect its privacy and security, and must state that the information will not be sold, exchanged, transferred, or otherwise disclosed except as necessary and permitted under law in order to implement the wellness program.  Some of the provisions may repeat provisions of an existing HIPAA privacy notice.

Q.6: Can we email the ADA wellness program notice or must we distribute by hand?

A.6: You can email it so long as you are certain the email will reach the intended employees, e.g. through use of a current work email address, and so long as proper attention is brought to the nature of the notice (for instance, do not attach it to an email already containing a number of other, unrelated human resource forms or disclosures). You may also distribute in hard copy.  Your distribution method should take into account employee disabilities such as visual impairment, or learning disabilities.

Q.6: What confidentiality requirements apply under ADA regulations?

A.6: The employer must receive wellness data in aggregate form only, and may not require an employee to agree to the sale, exchange, sharing, transfer or other disclosure of medical information, or to waive ADA confidentiality protections, as a condition for participation.  Note that ADA confidentiality rules would apply to a wellness program not linked to a group health plan, and for a wellness program that is a health plan or is linked to one, HIPAA/ACA privacy, security and breach notification measures must also be followed.  These rules independently would prohibit the employer from viewing individualized health data.

Q.7: What is the impact of “de minimis” wellness incentives such as tee-shirts and water bottles?

A.7: The ADA regulations do not recognize a “de minimis” rule, thus the approximate dollar value of all “in-kind” incentives should be counted towards the 30% incentive limit.  By contrast, for federal income tax purposes, the IRS allows small items such as tee-shirts and water bottles to be excluded from participants’ taxable income as de minimis fringe benefits under Internal Revenue Code (“Code”) Section 132(e).  See IRS Memo 2016-22031, discussed below.

Q.8: How does the IRS treat cash incentives to participate in a wellness program treated under the Internal Revenue Code?

A.8: In IRS Memo 2016-22031 the IRS concluded that cash incentives to take part in a wellness program, or amounts paid or reimbursed for more than de minimis items that do not qualify as Code Section 213(d) medical expenses (such as gym memberships) are included in employees’ taxable income.  The same is true when an employer uses a wellness program to reimburse employees for premium or other coverage amounts withheld from their salary under a Section 125 cafeteria plan.

Q.9: What is the ADA’s  “insurance safe harbor” or “bona fide benefit plan” safe harbor, and can employers use it to justify a wellness program that does not meet the new ADA wellness program criteria?

A.9: The insurance safe harbor or “bona fide benefit plan” safe harbor permits the gathering of health data from employees so long as it is for underwriting or risk classification purposes, e.g., in order to determine insurability or establish premiums and other costs of coverage.   The safe harbor typically would apply to an insurance carrier but also could apply to a self-insured health plan.  In the past several years, a few employers have successfully used the safe harbor to prevail over EEOC federal court challenges to wellness programs that conditioned very high financial incentives on completion of an HRA or biometric testing; see, e.g., Seff v. Broward County, 691 F.3d 1221 (11th Cir. 2012); EEOC v. Flambeau, Inc., 131 F. Supp. 3d 849 (W.D.Wis. 2015).  The ADA regulations expressly make the insurance safe harbor unavailable to employers sponsoring wellness programs, but this does not resolve how the issue will be determined in federal courts.

Q.10: Are there other GINA regulations that impact wellness programs?

A.10: Yes, Title I of GINA applies to health insurance issuers and group health plans (including self-insured health plans), and prohibits requiring an individual to provide genetic information (including through answering a family history question on an HRA) prior to or in connection with plan enrollment, or at any time in connection with “underwriting purposes,” which broadly refers to any provision of a reward or incentive.  As a result of GINA Title I, a plan may use an HRA that requests family medical history only if it is requested to be completed after plan enrollment and is unrelated to enrollment, and if there is no premium reduction or any other reward offered.

Leave a comment

Filed under Affordable Care Act, Americans with Disabilities Act, Benefit Plan Design, Cafeteria Plans, Flex Plans, Fringe Benefits, GINA/Genetic Privacy, Health Care Reform, HIPAA and HITECH, PPACA, Wellness Programs