Category Archives: 403(b) Plans

State Auto-IRA Programs: What Employers Need to Know

pelskgra2nu-fabian-blank

California and four other states (Connecticut, Illinois, Maryland and Oregon) have passed legislation requiring employers that do not sponsor employee retirement plans to automatically withhold funds from employees’ pay, and forward them to IRAs maintained under state-run investment programs. Provided that these auto-IRA programs meet safe harbor requirements recently defined by the Department of Labor in final regulations, the programs will be exempt from ERISA and employers cannot be held liable for investment selection or outcome.  The DOL has also finalized regulations that would permit large cities and other political subdivisions to sponsor such programs where no statewide mandate exists; New York City has proposed its own such program, tentatively dubbed the New York City Nest Egg Plan.

In light of this growing trend, what do employers need to know about auto-IRA programs?   Some key points are listed below:

  1. Some Lead Time Exists. Even for state auto-IRA programs that become effective January 1, 2017 (e.g., in California and Oregon), actual implementation of employee contributions is pushed out to July 1, 2017 (in Oregon) and, in California, enrollment must wait until regulations governing the program are adopted. The California program, titled the California Secure Choice Retirement Savings Program, also phases in participation based on employer size. Employers with 100 or more employees must participate within 12 months after the program opens for enrollment, those with 50 or more within 24 months, and employers with fewer than 50 employees must participate within 36 months. These deadlines may be extended, but at present the earliest round of enrollment is anticipated to occur in 2019.
  2. Employer Involvement is Strictly Limited. The DOL safe harbor prohibits employer contributions to auto-IRAs and requires that employers fulfill only the following “ministerial” (clerical) tasks:
    • forwarding employee salary deferrals to the program
    • providing notice of the program to the employees and maintaining contribution records
    • providing information to the state as required, and
    • distributing state program information to employees.  Note that in California, the Employment Development Department will develop enrollment materials for employers to distribute, and in addition a state-selected third party administrator will collect and invest contributions, effectively limiting the employer role to forwarding salary deferrals.
  3. Employers Always Have the Option of Maintaining their Own Plan. Generally the state auto-IRA programs established to date exempt employers that maintain or establish any retirement plan (401(k), pension, SEP, or SIMPLE), even plans with no auto-enrollment feature or employer match used to encourage employee salary deferrals. Therefore employers need not be significantly out of pocket (other than for administrative fees) to avoid a state auto-IRA mandate. Employers should bear in mind that an employer-sponsored retirement program, even if only a SEP or SIMPLE IRA, helps to attract and retain valued staff, and should consider establishing their own plan in advance of auto-IRA program effective dates for that reason.
  4. Penalties May Apply. California’s auto-IRA program imposes a financial penalty on employers that fail to participate.   The penalty is equal to $250 per eligible employee if employer failure to comply lasts 90 or more days after receipt of a compliance notice; this increases to $500 per employee if noncompliance extends 180 or more days after notification. The Illinois auto-IRA program imposes a similar penalty.
  5. Voluntary Participation in Auto-IRA Program May Create an ERISA Plan. One of the requirements of the DOL safe harbor is that employer participation in auto-IRA programs (referred to as “State payroll deduction savings programs” be compulsory under state law. If participation is voluntary, an employer will be deemed to have established an ERISA plan. In theory, this rule could be triggered when an employer that was mandated to participate later drops below the number of employees needed to trigger the applicable state mandate (for instance, a California employer that drops below 5 employees), but continues to participate. The DOL leaves it to the states to determine whether participation remains compulsory for employers despite reductions in the number of employees.   The DOL also notes that, under an earlier safe harbor regulation from 1975, an employer that is not subject to state mandated auto-IRA programs can forward employees’ salary deferrals to IRAs on their behalf without triggering ERISA, provided that the employee salary deferrals are voluntary and not automatic.   The DOL final regulations can be read to suggest that a payroll-to-IRA forwarding arrangement that is voluntary and that meets the other requirements of the 1975 safe harbor will constitute a pre-existing workplace savings arrangement for purposes of exempting an employer from a state-mandated auto-IRA program.
  6. The Trump Administration Will Likely Support Auto-IRA Programs. Early and necessarily tentative conclusions are that the Trump Administration will continue to support the DOL’s safe harbor regulation exempting auto-IRA programs from ERISA, as well as other state-based efforts to address the significant savings gap now known to confront much of the country’s workforce.   One unknown variable is the degree to which the Trump Administration will be influenced by opposition to the programs mounted by the financial industry. Until the direction of the Trump Administration becomes clearer, employers that do not currently maintain a retirement plan should track auto-IRA legislation in their state or city and otherwise prepare to comply with a state or more local program in the near future, ideally by adopting their own retirement plan for employees.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under 401(k) Plans, 403(b) Plans, California Secure Choice Retirement Savings Program, ERISA, Fiduciary Issues, Payroll Issues, State Auto-IRA Programs

IRS Announces New Benefit Limits for 2017

dollar-1362244_960_720

On October 28, 2017 the IRS announced 2017 cost-of-living adjustments for annual contribution and other dollar limits affecting 401(k) and other retirement plans.   Salary deferral limits to 401(k) and 403(b) plans remained unchanged for the second year in a row, but other dollar limit adjustments were made. Citations below are to the Internal Revenue Code.

Limits That Remain the Same for 2017 Are As Follows:

–The annual Salary Deferral Limit for 401(k), 403(b), and most 457 plans, currently $18,000, stays the same.

–The age 50 and up catch-up deferral limit, currently $6,000, also remains the same. For 2017 as in this year, the maximum salary deferral an individual age 50 or older may make is $24,000.

–The compensation threshold for determining a “highly compensated employee” remains unchanged at $120,000.

–Traditional and Roth IRA contributions and catch-up amounts remain unchanged at $5,500 and $1,000, respectively.

–The compensation threshold for SEP participation remained the same at $600.

–The SIMPLE 401(k) and IRA contribution limit remained the same at $12,500.

Limits That Changed for 2017 Are As Follows:

–The maximum total annual contribution to a 401(k) or other “defined contribution” plan under 415(c) increased from $53,000 ($59,000 for employees aged 50 and older) to $54,000 ($60,000 for employees aged 50 and olded).

–The maximum annual benefit under a defined benefit plan increased from $210,000 to $215,000.

–The maximum amount of compensation on which contributions may be based under 401(a)(17) increased from $265,000 to $270,000.

-The compensation dollar limit used to determine key employees in a top-heavy plan increased from $170,000 to $175,000.

In a separate announcement, the Social Security Taxable Wage Base for 2017 increased from $118,500 to $127,200.  

Leave a comment

Filed under 401(k) Plans, 403(b) Plans, Benefit Plan Design, COLA Increases, ERISA, IRA Issues, Profit Sharing Plan, Section 457(b) Plans

Chart of Section 457(f) Carve-Outs Under New Proposed Regulations

The IRS recently announced proposed regulations under Internal Revenue Code (“Code”) Section 457 that update prior, final regulations issued in 2003 and other subsequent guidance from IRS.  Section 457 governs deferred compensation rules for government employees, and for executives of private, tax-exempt organizations it permits deferrals from compensation over and above limits set forth in Code § 403(b).  The proposed Section 457 regulations impact “ineligible” deferred compensation plans under Code § 457(f) more substantially than “eligible” deferred compensation plans under Code § 457(b) which were more comprehensively covered in the 2003 final regulations.

By contrast to eligible Section 457(b) plans, which limit annual contributions to $18,000, as adjusted for inflation (and without the age 50 catch-up for private non-profit executives), there is no dollar limit on annual contributions to a Section 457(f) plan (although as explained below other laws do set reasonableness limits upon nonprofit executive compensation in general).   However, amounts set aside under Section 457(f) plans must be included in the executive’s taxable compensation once the amounts are no longer subject to a substantial risk of forfeiture, for instance upon completion of a vesting schedule, even if amounts are not physically paid out from the plan.  Due to the requirement that income inclusion/taxation occur when the substantial risk of forfeiture lapses, Section 457(f) plans generally work best when retirement is in the fairly near future (e.g., 5 to 7 years out), and where vesting occurs on or near the anticipated retirement date.

As summarized in the chart, below, the proposed regulations clarify how certain pay arrangements are carved out from Section 457(f) compliance, either because the arrangement is not deemed to provide for a deferral of compensation, or because it defers compensation but not in a manner that does not fall under Code § 457(f). Where no deferral of compensation occurs, the pay arrangement generally is also exempt from the “Enron rules” applicable to for-profit deferred compensation plans under Code § 409A, and related regulations.  (Final regulations under Code § 409A were published in 2007; the second of two sets of proposed regulations were published the same day as the proposed Section 457 regulations).  The proposed Section 457 regulations clarify that Section 457(f) arrangements generally are also subject to Code § 409A, although there are some important distinctions between the two sets of rules which I will address in a future post.

457(f) Chart

 

Leave a comment

Filed under 403(b) Plans, COLA Increases, Fringe Benefits, Nonqualified Deferred Compensation, Section 409A, Section 457(b) Plans, Section 457(f) Plans

Benefits Compliance: Where You Get It; What You Need (Poll)

Y01VDYAX63Changes in the law and continued advances in technology have made benefits compliance a constantly shifting landscape.  As one of many potential sources for your own path towards benefits compliance, E for ERISA would very much appreciate your participation in the following poll, which asks a few simple questions about where you currently get your benefits compliance services and what you may still need in that regard.  Thank you in advance for (anonymously) sharing your thoughts and experiences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under 401(k) Plans, 403(b) Plans, Affordable Care Act, Applicable Large Employer Reporting, Benefit Plan Design, Employer Shared Responsibility, ERISA, Federally Facilitated Exchange, Fiduciary and Fee Issues, Fiduciary Issues, Fringe Benefits, Health Care Reform, HIPAA and HITECH, Payroll Issues, Plan Reporting and Disclosure Duties, PPACA, Profit Sharing Plan, Uncategorized

Few Changes Are Made to 2016 Benefit Plan Limits

On October 21, 2015 the IRS announced 2016 cost-of-living adjustments for annual contribution and other dollar limits affecting 401(k) and other retirement plans.   There are few changes to be noted, as the increase in the cost-of-living index stayed below many thresholds necessary to trigger adjustments. Citations below are to the Internal Revenue Code.

Limits That Remain the Same for 2016 Are As Follows:

–The annual Salary Deferral Limit for 401(k), 403(b), and most 457 plans, currently $18,000, stays the same.

–The age 50 and up catch-up limit, currently $6,000, also remains the same. For 2016 as in this year, the maximum plan deferral an individual age 50 or older may make is $24,000.

–Maximum total annual contributions to a 401(k) or other “defined contribution” plans under 415(c) remains at $53,000 ($59,000 for employees aged 50 and older).

–The maximum annual benefit under a defined benefit plan remained at $210,000.

–Maximum amount of compensation on which contributions may be based under 401(a)(17) remains at $265,000.

–The compensation threshold for determining a “highly compensated employee” remains unchanged at $120,000.

–The compensation dollar limit used to determine key employees in a top-heavy plan remains unchanged at $170,000.

–The compensation threshold for SEP participation remained the same at $600.

–The SIMPLE 401(k) and IRA contribution limit remained the same at $12,500.

–Traditional and Roth IRA contributions and catch-up amounts remain unchanged at $5,500 and $1,000, respectively.

–The Social Security Taxable Wage Base for 2016 remains at this year’s level, $118,500.

Limits That Changed for 2016 Are As Follows:

  • The deductibility of IRA contributions made by someone who is not covered by an employer’s retirement plan but is married to someone who is, phases out if their joint income is between $184,000 and $194,000, up from $183,000 and $193,000.
  • The deductibility of contributions to a Roth IRA phases out over the following adjusted gross income ranges:
    • $184,000 to $194,000 for married couples filing jointly, also up from $183,000 and $193,000;
    • $117,000 to $132,000 for singles and heads of households, up from $116,000 to $131,000.
  • The retirement savings contribution tax credit (saver’s credit) for low and moderate-income workers is limited to those whose adjusted gross income does not exceed:
    • $61,500 for married couples filing jointly, up from $61,000;
    • $46,125 for heads of households, up from $45,750; and
    • $30,750 for married filing separately and for singles, up from $30,500.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under 401(k) Plans, 403(b) Plans, COLA Increases, ERISA, IRA Issues, Nondiscrimination Rules for Insured Health Plans, Profit Sharing Plan

IRS Announces Increased 2015 Retirement Plan Contribution Limits

On October 23, 2014 the IRS announced 2015 cost-of-living adjustments for annual contribution and other dollar limits affecting 401(k) and other retirement plans.   A 1.7% rise in the September CPI-U over 2013 triggered $500 increases to the annual maximum salary deferral limit for 401(k) plans, and the catch-up limit for individuals age 50 or older. Citations below are to the Internal Revenue Code.

Limits That Increase for 2015 Are As Follows:

–The annual Salary Deferral Limit for 401(k), 403(b), and most 457 plans, currently $17,500, increases $500 to $18,000.

–The age 50 and up catch-up limit also increases $500, to $6,000 total. This means that the maximum plan deferral an individual age 50 or older in 2015 may make is $24,000.

–Maximum total annual contributions to a 401(k) or other “defined contribution” plans under 415(c) increased from $52,000 to $53,000 ($59,000 for employees aged 50 and older).

–Maximum amount of compensation on which contributions may be based under 401(a)(17) increased from $260,000 to $265,000.

–The compensation threshold for determining a “highly compensated employee” increased from $115,000 to $120,000.

–The compensation threshold for SEP participation increased from $550 to $600.

–The SIMPLE 401(k) and IRA contribution limit increased $500 to $12,500.

–The Social Security Taxable Wage Base for 2015 increased from $117,000 to $118,500.

Limits That Stayed The Same for 2015 Are As Follows:

–Traditional and Roth IRA contributions and catch-up amounts remain unchanged at $5,500 and $1,000, respectively.

–The compensation dollar limit used to determine key employees in a top-heavy plan remains unchanged at $170,000.

–The maximum annual benefit under a defined benefit plan remained at $210,000.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under 401(k) Plans, 403(b) Plans, COLA Increases, ERISA, IRA Issues, Profit Sharing Plan

IRS Announces 2014 Benefit Limits

On October 31, 2013 the IRS announced 2014 cost-of-living adjustments for annual contribution and other dollar limits affecting 401(k) and other retirement plans.  The announcement had been delayed until the September 2013 Consumer Price Index for Urban Consumers (CPI-U) was available, which in turn was delayed by the government shutdown over the budget and debt ceiling debate.   A modest 1.2% rise in the September CPI-U over 2013 left a number of the dollar limits unchanged for 2014, although a few limits have increased (citations are to the Internal Revenue Code).
Some limits that did not change for 2014 are as follows:
–Salary Deferral Limit for 401(k), 403(b), and 457 plans remains unchanged at $17,500. The age 50 and up catch-up limit also remains unchanged at $5,500 for a total contribution limit of $23,000.
–The compensation threshold for “highly compensated employee” remained at $115,000 for a second year in a row.
–Traditional and Roth IRA contributions and catch-up amounts remain unchanged at $5,500 and $1,000, respectively.
–SIMPLE 401(k) and IRA contribution limits remain at $12,000.
Limits that did increase are as follows:
–Maximum total contribution to a 401(k) or other “defined contribution” plans under 415(c) increased from $51,000 to $52,000 ($57,500 for employees aged 50 and older).
–Maximum amount of compensation on which contributions may be based under 401(1)(17) increased from $255,000 to $260,000.
–Maximum annual benefit under a defined benefit plan increased from $205,000 to $210,000.
–Social Security Taxable Wage Base increased from $113,700 to $117,000.
–The dollar limit defining “key employee” in a top-heavy plan increased from $165,000 to $170,000.

Leave a comment

Filed under 401(k) Plans, 403(b) Plans, Benefit Plan Design, COLA Increases, ERISA, IRA Issues, Nondiscrimination Rules for Insured Health Plans, Profit Sharing Plan