Category Archives: 403(b) Plans

2019 COLA Adjustments: Let’s Do the Numbers

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On November 1, 2019, the IRS announced 2019 cost-of-living adjustments for annual contribution and other dollar limits affecting 401(k) and other retirement plans.   Salary deferral limits to 401(k) and 403(b) plans increased $500 to $19,000, and a number of other dollar limits increased.  Citations below are to the Internal Revenue Code.

In a separate announcement, the Social Security Taxable Wage Base for 2019 increased to $132,900, from $128,400 in 2018.

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Filed under 401(k) Plans, 403(b) Plans, Benefit Plan Design, COLA Increases, ERISA, Nondiscrimination Testing for Qualified Retirement Plans, Profit Sharing Plan, Section 457(b) Plans

IRS Plan Correction Program Goes Digital

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The IRS maintains a voluntary correction program for retirement plan sponsors, called the Employee Plans Compliance Resolution Program, or EPCRS. Plan errors that have occurred within 2 years generally may be eligible for self-correction, whereas older plan errors that are “significant” must be corrected with IRS approval through the Voluntary Compliance Program, or VCP. EPCRS is a very popular way for plan sponsors to resolve plan problems on their own schedule, and without suffering the monetary penalties that likely would apply in the event of a plan audit.

On September 28, 2018, the IRS announced that, effective April 1, 2019, VCP submissions, including payment of “user fees,” must be made electronically through the www.pay.gov website, per the instructions set forth in Revenue Procedure 2018-52. Plan sponsors, or their authorized representatives, may voluntarily use the electronic submission method starting January 1, 2019, but it will be mandatory starting April 1, 2019 and the IRS will reject hard copy VCP submissions postmarked on or after that date.

Revenue Procedure 2018-52 makes extensive revisions to Sections 2, 10 and 11 of Revenue Procedure 2016-51 (and otherwise generally supersedes it) to describe the new electronic user fee payment and VCP submission methods.  Under the new methods, a plan sponsor must either itself submit the VCP application electronically, or authorize a representative to do so via Form 2848, Power of Attorney.  Only third parties designated via Form 2848, such as attorneys, CPAs, or enrolled agents, can sign and file the VCP application on the plan sponsor’s behalf.  (A plan sponsor may use Form 8821 to designate other representatives (such as unenrolled return preparers) to inspect or receive confidential information from IRS about the submission.)

Under the new procedures, the VCP submission process will be as follows (note that links to IRS forms are not provided as they may be changing as a result of the new Revenue Procedure):

  1. Create an account at www.pay.gov, if one does not already exist. If using an authorized representative (AR), confirm that the AR has a www.pay.gov account.
  2. Using www.pay.gov, complete Form 8950, Application for Voluntary Correction Program (VCP).  If using an AR, the AR will complete the form.
  3. Assemble, into a single PDF file not exceeding 15 MB, the following:
  • Plan Sponsor’s signed Penalty of Perjury Statement. (This used to be part of IRS Form 8950 but now will be a separate statement.
  • Form 2848, Power of Attorney, or Form 8821, Tax Information Authorization. If using an AR, you must check line 5a for “Other acts authorized” on Form 2848 and include as a description “signing and filing of the Form 8950 and accompanying documents as part of a VCP submission.”
  • Form 14568, Model VCP Compliance Statement, and any/all applicable Schedules to same (Forms 14568-A through 14568-I), and required enclosures.  Alternatively, a cover letter and separate written narrative could be used.
  • Sample earnings calculations and earnings computations.
  • Relevant plan document language or full plan document when applicable (e.g., non-amender failures).
  • Copy of opinion, advisory, or determination letter, if applicable, pertaining to the plan document.
  • Any other required information, such as statement required for 403(b) plans re: cooperation of all investment providers.

4.  Upload the PDF file at www.pay.gov. If information supporting the submission exceeds the size limit, follow special fax instructions set forth in Section 11.03(7) of the Revenue Procedure.

5.  Use www.pay.gov to pay the user fee, as set forth in Appendix A of Revenue Procedure 2018-4 (and successor Revenue Procedures issued at the beginning of each year). The user fees are now based on plan assets rather than the number of plan participants.

6.  Keep the “Payment Confirmation – Application for Voluntary Correction Program” that is generated on successful filing through pay.gov; the Tracking ID on this receipt serves as the IRS control number for your submission and is official acknowledgement of the submission; if no confirmation is generated call (877) 829-5500 for assistance.

If you discover additional operational errors after submitting your VCP materials, but before the submission has been assigned to an IRS representative, you are directed to call the VCP Status Inquiry Line at (626) 927-2011 (not toll-free) for further information. Although it is currently customary for the IRS to contact the filer once a submission is assigned to an IRS representative, this may not be the case in the future; in the Revenue Procedure the IRS reserves the right to process submissions and issue compliance statements without any prior contact with the filer.  If the IRS gets the jump on you in this manner, you will likely have to pay a new user fee and address the later-discovered errors under a new VCP submission.

Even before the recent increase in VCP user fees, EPCRS was a consistently strong revenue source for the IRS and the new digital streamlining of the program will likely increase its use by plan sponsors over time.

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Filed under 401(k) Plans, 403(b) Plans, EPCRS, ERISA, VCP, Voluntary Compliance Programs

California Wildfires: Congress Grants Expanded Access to Retirement Savings

The recently-signed Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 (the “Act”) expands access to 401(k) and other retirement plan savings for those impacted by the California wildfires that occurred late last year in federally-declared disaster areas including Santa Barbara and Ventura counties. The expanded access is available to individuals whose principal residence is or was located in the “California wildfire disaster area” at any time between October 8, 2017 to December 31, 2017 and who sustained an economic loss – whether personal or business – as a result of the wildfires, and whose employer agrees to amend their plan by December 31, 2019 to include the special rules (retroactive to 2018).   Those taking IRA withdrawals should check with their IRA custodians or trustees re: availability of the new measures.

As to whether the relief extends to those affected by flooding, mudflows, and debris flows directly related to the wildfires, there is some uncertainty in the wording of the Act. As mentioned above, eligible individuals are determined based on their residence on or before December 31, 2017, a date which preceded the January 9, 2018 flooding, mud and debris flow.  However, the Act defines “California wildfire disaster area” as the area subject to Presidential disaster declarations made between January 1, 2017 through January 18, 2018.  The original California wildfire disaster declaration was made January 2, 2018, and was amended on January 10 and 15 to incorporate damage from flooding, mudslides and debris flow directly related to the wildfires, which would suggest that those related types of damage would come within the scope of the relief. More guidance from the government would be helpful on this point.

There are three main types of expanded access:

  • Special withdrawal rules

-Eligible individuals may take plan or IRA withdrawals of up to $100,000 without application of the 10% penalty tax that ordinarily applies before age 59 ½.  Although California’s Franchise Tax Board generally follows federal disaster relief, a California early withdrawal penalty of 2.5% may apply, so check with your CPA.  The withdrawal must take place between October 8, 2017 and December 31, 2018.  The tax impact of the withdrawal may be spread over up to 3 years from the date of the withdrawal, or tax may be avoided entirely by repaying the full amount to the plan, or an IRA, within the same 3 year period.

  • Retirement plan loan relief

– An extension of up to one year applies to repayments due on a plan loan that was outstanding on or after October 8, 2017.  The one year extension does not cause the loan to exceed the maximum five-year repayment period.  Interest continues to accrue during the extension.

– New plan loans may be taken out on or after Feb. 9, 2018, through Dec. 31, 2018 in an amount up to the lesser of $100,000, or 100% of the vested retirement plan account (increased from $50,000 or 50%).   The limit is reduced by an amount equal to the highest outstanding balance of all loans during the prior twelve months.

  • Repayment of amounts taken out to buy or build a home in the disaster area

  –Persons who took hardship withdrawals from their plans after March 31, 2017 and before January 15, 2018 in order to buy or build a personal residence can re-deposit their withdrawals, or roll them to an IRA, by June 30, 2018, if the purchase or construction could not go forward as a result of the wildfires. The same relief is available to first-time homebuyer IRA withdrawals made during this time.

In earlier guidance, the IRS extended the filing deadline for personal and business income taxes by two weeks for those affected by the California wildfires, and California’s Franchise Tax Board granted equivalent relief for state returns. The new deadline for personal returns is April 30, 2018.

Note:  a version of this post was published in the Pacific Coast Business Times on February 23, 2018.

 

 

 

 

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Filed under 401(k) Plans, 403(b) Plans, Disaster Relief, ERISA, IRA Issues, Profit Sharing Plan

New Year Brings New, (Sometimes) Lower VCP User Fees

Effective January 2, 2018, the IRS has materially lowered the user fees required to be paid in order to participate in the Voluntary Compliance Program (VCP) under the Employee Plans Compliance Resolution System or EPCRS.  VCP is a way for sponsors of qualified retirement plans to get IRS approval of voluntary correction of operational errors and other plan errors that jeopardize the plan’s tax-qualified status.  Under old user fees, which were based on the number of plan participants as of the last day of a plan year, most applicants fell within the 100 – 1,000 participant range, which in 2017 carried a fee of $5,000.  The new fees, set forth in Appendix A to IRS Revenue Procedure 2018-1, are based on plan assets as of the last day of the plan year and are as follows:

User Fee               Plan Assets

$1,500                   $500,000 or less

$3,000                   Over $500,000 to $10,000,000

$3,500                   Over $10,000,000

As many if not most plan sponsors will fall in the over $500,000 to $10,000,000 range, this will result in a $2,000 reduction in the applicable user fee.

Lowering the price barrier to participation in VCP is a positive for plan sponsors.  Obtaining a compliance statement from IRS through the program is the equivalent of insurance against penalties and interest that would be assessed if the plan problems were discovered on audit.  The VCP compliance statement is also crucial in the event the plan sponsor sells its business or merges with another entity, as plan problems must be disclosed in the pre-deal due diligence stage, and unresolved plan problems can slow down or even derail a sale or merger transaction.  Speaking of insurance, some fiduciary liability insurance carriers will cover, and provide reimbursement for, the VCP user fee and professional services used in preparing the application (although generally amounts that are owed to the plan are not covered).

There is a downside to this new fee schedule, namely in the loss of reduced fees (as low as $300) for submissions that were limited to participant loan errors, failures to make required minimum distributions, and SEP and SIMPLE plan submissions.

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Filed under 401(k) Plans, 403(b) Plans, EPCRS, ERISA, Profit Sharing Plan, VCP

IRS Announces New Benefit Limits for 2018

olga-delawrence-386839On October 19, 2017 the IRS announced 2018 cost-of-living adjustments for annual contribution and other dollar limits affecting 401(k) and other retirement plans.   Salary deferral limits to 401(k) and 403(b) plans increased $500 to $18,500, but other dollar limits remained unchanged, including the compensation threshold for highly compensated employee status. Specifically, an employee will be a highly compensated employee (HCE) in 2018 on the basis of compensation if he or she earned more than $120,000 in 2017.  Citations below are to the Internal Revenue Code.

In a separate announcement, the Social Security Taxable Wage Base for 2018 increased to $128,400 from $127,200.

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Filed under 401(k) Plans, 403(b) Plans, COLA Increases, ERISA, IRA Issues, Nondiscrimination Testing for Qualified Retirement Plans, Profit Sharing Plan, Section 457(b) Plans

Beyond the 403(b) Plan: Top 5 Things to Know About Deferred Compensation for Non-Profit Executives

Tax-exempt employers may offer deferred compensation plans to their select executives to allow for retirement savings over and above the dollar limits applicable under a Section 403(b) plan. However the rules governing these arrangements, which fall under Section 457 of the Internal Revenue Code (Code), are complex and often misunderstood.  Below are five things top things to keep in mind in this area, to get the most that the law offers without unpleasant tax surprises along the way.

1.  It’s complicated……

First, there are two types of 457 plans: 457(b) plans and 457(f) plans.  A tax-exempt employer can use both for the same executives but careful planning is advised.  The (b) plans allow set-aside (in the form of employee deferrals or employer contributions) of only $18,000 (in 2017) per year, with no age 50+ catch-up allowance.  Amounts set aside under a (b) plan are not taxed until they are distributed to the executive, an event which must be delayed until termination of employment/retirement, or on the occurrence of unforeseeable circumstances (narrowly defined).  Taxation is delayed until distribution even though the amounts are generally “vested” (no longer subject to forfeiture) when they are contributed.  By contrast there is no dollar limit on the amount that may be set aside under a 457(f) plan (subject to item no. 4, below), but the amounts are taxable upon completion of a vesting schedule (e.g., from 3 to 10 years).  Therefore distribution in full almost always happens upon completion of vesting.  Put most simply, (b) plans are a good way to double an executive’s 403(b) deferral budget, and (f) plans are a good way to help an executive catch up on retirement savings when a retirement or other departure date is within a 3 to 10 year time horizon. Further, in order for an exemption from ERISA to apply, participation in these plans must be limited to a “select group of management or highly compensated employees,” comprising no more than 5% – 10% of the total workforce, referred to as the “top-hat” group.  In a small tax-exempt employer with 10 or 20 employees this may mean only 1 or 2 executives may participate.

2.  You (usually) can’t roll to an IRA.

Generally when an executive is ready to take distribution of benefits from a 457(b) or (f) plan a taxable cash distribution is required, and rollover to an IRA is not an option. (One exception is when the executive moves to a new employer that maintains a 457(b) plan that accepts rollover contributions).  Under a (b) plan, which may allow installment distributions over a period of years, the lack of an IRA rollover option is not so severe, but in a 457(f) plan setting, which generally calls for lump-sum distributions, the tax impact can be severe and the executives should be advised to do advance tax planning with their own CPAs or other tax advisors, well ahead of their planned retirement date or other vesting trigger.  In my experience, lack of the IRA rollover option often comes as an unwelcome surprise to the covered executives.

3.  The assets belong to the organization.

Section 457 plans are non-qualified meaning in relevant part that they assets the plans hold belong to the tax-exempt organization that sponsors the plan until the date(s) they are paid out to the participants. The assets must be held in an account in the name of the organization “FBO” the 457 plan account for the name of the executive.  There is no form of creditor protection but it is possible to put in place a “rabbi trust,” so called because the trust format was first approved by the IRS on behalf of a synagogue for its spiritual leader.  The rabbi trust will not protect the 457 assets from the organization’s creditors, but it will prevent the organization from reneging on the deferred compensation promise to an executive.  This is particularly helpful for an organization that anticipates changes in its board structure after approval of a 457 arrangement.

4.  The normal “reasonable compensation” rules still apply.

Tax-exempt organizations must pay only reasonable compensation, in light of the services provided, to employees and other individuals who comprise “disqualified persons,” a category that includes executive directors and other “C-suite” members. Under the “intermediate sanction” regime the IRS imposes excise taxes on individuals who benefit under, and organization managers (e.g., board members) who approve, compensation arrangements that fail the reasonableness standard.  Deferred compensation arrangements must be reasonable in light of all other compensation and benefits provided to the executives in question and in most cases this will require a third-party compensation consultant’s evaluation and review.  This is a vitally important and often-overlooked piece of deferred compensation compliance in the tax-exempt arena.

5.  DOL notification is required.

As part of the ERISA exemption for top-hat deferred compensation plans, a tax-exempt organization must provide a “top-hat notification letter” to the Department of Labor within 120 days of implementing such a plan. Top-hat letters must be filed electronically.  Failure to timely file a top-hat letter could mean that your deferred compensation plan is liable for ERISA penalties for failure to file annual information returns (Form 5500), to hold plan assets in trust, to make certain disclosures to participants, and on a host of other compliance points.  The Department of Labor permits late filing of top-hat notification letters for payment of a modest fee.  If your organization has a deferred compensation plan in place you should have ready access to a copy of the top-hat notification letter (or confirmation of its online filing) and should consider the DOL correction program if you cannot do so.

Having practiced law in Santa Barbara, California, a haven for charitable organizations, for over 20 years I have had the privilege of working with these special deferred compensation plan rules in many different factual settings and would be happy to help your organization navigate them in order to best retain and reward your valued executives.

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Filed under 403(b) Plans, Benefit Plan Design, Section 457(b) Plans, Section 457(f) Plans, Tax-Exempt Organizations, Top-Hat Exemption

State Auto-IRA Programs: What Employers Need to Know

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California and four other states (Connecticut, Illinois, Maryland and Oregon) have passed legislation requiring employers that do not sponsor employee retirement plans to automatically withhold funds from employees’ pay, and forward them to IRAs maintained under state-run investment programs. Provided that these auto-IRA programs meet safe harbor requirements recently defined by the Department of Labor in final regulations, the programs will be exempt from ERISA and employers cannot be held liable for investment selection or outcome.  The DOL has also finalized regulations that would permit large cities and other political subdivisions to sponsor such programs where no statewide mandate exists; New York City has proposed its own such program, tentatively dubbed the New York City Nest Egg Plan.

In light of this growing trend, what do employers need to know about auto-IRA programs?   Some key points are listed below:

  1. Some Lead Time Exists. Even for state auto-IRA programs that become effective January 1, 2017 (e.g., in California and Oregon), actual implementation of employee contributions is pushed out to July 1, 2017 (in Oregon) and, in California, enrollment must wait until regulations governing the program are adopted. The California program, titled the California Secure Choice Retirement Savings Program, also phases in participation based on employer size. Employers with 100 or more employees must participate within 12 months after the program opens for enrollment, those with 50 or more within 24 months, and employers with fewer than 50 employees must participate within 36 months. These deadlines may be extended, but at present the earliest round of enrollment is anticipated to occur in 2019.
  2. Employer Involvement is Strictly Limited. The DOL safe harbor prohibits employer contributions to auto-IRAs and requires that employers fulfill only the following “ministerial” (clerical) tasks:
    • forwarding employee salary deferrals to the program
    • providing notice of the program to the employees and maintaining contribution records
    • providing information to the state as required, and
    • distributing state program information to employees.  Note that in California, the Employment Development Department will develop enrollment materials for employers to distribute, and in addition a state-selected third party administrator will collect and invest contributions, effectively limiting the employer role to forwarding salary deferrals.
  3. Employers Always Have the Option of Maintaining their Own Plan. Generally the state auto-IRA programs established to date exempt employers that maintain or establish any retirement plan (401(k), pension, SEP, or SIMPLE), even plans with no auto-enrollment feature or employer match used to encourage employee salary deferrals. Therefore employers need not be significantly out of pocket (other than for administrative fees) to avoid a state auto-IRA mandate. Employers should bear in mind that an employer-sponsored retirement program, even if only a SEP or SIMPLE IRA, helps to attract and retain valued staff, and should consider establishing their own plan in advance of auto-IRA program effective dates for that reason.
  4. Penalties May Apply. California’s auto-IRA program imposes a financial penalty on employers that fail to participate.   The penalty is equal to $250 per eligible employee if employer failure to comply lasts 90 or more days after receipt of a compliance notice; this increases to $500 per employee if noncompliance extends 180 or more days after notification. The Illinois auto-IRA program imposes a similar penalty.
  5. Voluntary Participation in Auto-IRA Program May Create an ERISA Plan. One of the requirements of the DOL safe harbor is that employer participation in auto-IRA programs (referred to as “State payroll deduction savings programs” be compulsory under state law. If participation is voluntary, an employer will be deemed to have established an ERISA plan. In theory, this rule could be triggered when an employer that was mandated to participate later drops below the number of employees needed to trigger the applicable state mandate (for instance, a California employer that drops below 5 employees), but continues to participate. The DOL leaves it to the states to determine whether participation remains compulsory for employers despite reductions in the number of employees.   The DOL also notes that, under an earlier safe harbor regulation from 1975, an employer that is not subject to state mandated auto-IRA programs can forward employees’ salary deferrals to IRAs on their behalf without triggering ERISA, provided that the employee salary deferrals are voluntary and not automatic.   The DOL final regulations can be read to suggest that a payroll-to-IRA forwarding arrangement that is voluntary and that meets the other requirements of the 1975 safe harbor will constitute a pre-existing workplace savings arrangement for purposes of exempting an employer from a state-mandated auto-IRA program.
  6. The Trump Administration Will Likely Support Auto-IRA Programs. Early and necessarily tentative conclusions are that the Trump Administration will continue to support the DOL’s safe harbor regulation exempting auto-IRA programs from ERISA, as well as other state-based efforts to address the significant savings gap now known to confront much of the country’s workforce.   One unknown variable is the degree to which the Trump Administration will be influenced by opposition to the programs mounted by the financial industry. Until the direction of the Trump Administration becomes clearer, employers that do not currently maintain a retirement plan should track auto-IRA legislation in their state or city and otherwise prepare to comply with a state or more local program in the near future, ideally by adopting their own retirement plan for employees.

 

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Filed under 401(k) Plans, 403(b) Plans, California Secure Choice Retirement Savings Program, ERISA, Fiduciary Issues, Payroll Issues, State Auto-IRA Programs